How To Spot Fake Off-White Air Force 1 (2024)

Written by
Ch David
real vs fake ow af1 og
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Last Updated on January 11, 2024 by Ch David

The medial text on the left and the right shoes is the most reliable spot way to spot fake Off-White Air Force. Fake Off-White manufacturers never manage to get this text right.

If you are here to learn how to spot fake Off-White Air Force 1, you are in the right place.

By the end of this guide, you’ll have all it takes to tell fake Off-White Air Forces.

Not the colourway you’re looking for? Check out our other guides:

  • Off-White Air Force 1 Black
  • Off-White Air Force 1 Volt
  • Off-White Air Force 1 MCA
  • Off-White Air Force 1 Yellow
  • Off-White Air Force 1 Brooklyn
  • Off-White Air Force 1 MoMA
  • Off-White Air Force 1 ComplexCon

Now that you know what we’re talking about, let’s get you to the proper fake vs real Off-White Air Force 1s.

How to tell if Air Force 1 Off-Whites are fake

You can tell if Air Force 1 Off-Whites are fake by checking the medial text on the left + right shoes. A fake pair never has the right placement and font weight for its characters, while a real example is always flawless.

Let’s check it out!

1. Medial text

We are going to analyze both the left and the right shoes and the text on these, but first, we are going to start with the left shoe.

1.1. Left shoe

  • The fake Off-White Air Force 1 OG White sneakers have the “c. 1982” text looking too thick and big, and the authentic pair is smaller.
  • The “TM” text is too big too on the fake pair.
  • Besides the size, the fake “TM” text is too visible, while the authentic “TM” is less opaque.
  • The fake “USA” text has the letter “U” less covered than the authentic one.
  • The letter “U” has to be covered more by the Swoosh on any authentic Off-White Air Force 1.

1.2. Right shoe

  • The “Off” print is too boxy and it has a different shape than the real text.
  • The fake sneakers have their “TM” text looking taller, less boxy and leaning too much to the left.
  • In the word “Beaverton”, the fake letter “B” is too big at the top.
  • Then, the “c. 1982” text is too curvy and rounded.
  • At the same time, the “c. 1982” text is too thin on the fake Off-Whites.
  • The “USA” print on the rightest side is too thick.

Finding it too hard? Reach out to our Nike x Off-White experts:

2. Swoosh

We will start with the form of the Swoosh, and then check the stitching on the logo.

2.1. Form

  • The logo is arching too much at the top.

See how the authentic Swoosh is less curvy.

2.2. Stitching

  • The stitching on the fake Swoosh does not make contact with these two little parallel lines of stitching.

The real pair’s stitching comes from the Swoosh making contact with the two parallel lines of stitching on the shoe.

3. “AIR” text

  • The fake Off-White Air Force 1 pair has the “AIR” text looking less opaque and visible than the authentic one.
  • The legit “AIR” text is more visible than the fake one.
  • The fake text “AIR” text looks too thin, and the legit Off-White AF1s have their text thicker.

A quick mention:

  • The steps we’ve written so far are the BEST ways to authenticate this item
  • The next few steps are still reliable methods…
  • … but they apply to non-top-versions of replicas available for this item

If in doubt, we recommend double-checking the steps we’ve explained above this line.

4. Code stamp

  • The fake Off-White Air Force 1 has the whole text too narrowed and stretched out.
    • Essentially, the replica sneakers have this text looking too small.
  • The fake number “9” is too far away from the hashtag (#) next to it.
  • The fake “K – 5” text has too much distance between the two characters.
    • In fact, the dash (-) is different from the fake pair, and it also looks too small.
  • Also, the character “5” from the first line of text, is too thin on the fake pair.
  • The hashtag (#) character is too thin as well.

5. Orange tab

  • The fake Off-White Air Force 1’s orange tab is too much of a rectangle.
  • The little white line that goes in the rear side of the green stitching is too visible on the fake sneakers.
  • On the fake Off-White Air Force 1, the green stitches above and over the orange tab are too thick.

6. Tongue

  • The fake label’s Swoosh doesn’t curve in order to get close to the “NIKE” text.

The authentic pair’s Swoosh is curvy, sharp, and close to the “NIKE” logo.

7. Insole

  • The fake pair has the insole “THE TEN” text looking too big and thick.
  • Also, the same problem with the thickness applies to Off-White’s “X” logo too.

8. Size tag

  • The fake Off-White Air Force 1 OG has the “MADE IN CHINA” text looking too thick.
  • The fake “SZ” text is too thick on the fake pair as well.

Shortlist: Spot fake Off-White Air Force 1

  1. Verify the medial text on your Off-White AF1. Mainly, the fake text is either too thin, or too thick, or the letter “c” in the “c.” text is a capital letter, instead of being the small “c”
  2. Check the Swoosh on your sneakers. Most of the time, the fake pairs have the Swoosh looking too curvy. Besides, the real Off-White Air Force 1s have stitching that comes from the Swoosh making contact with the two parallel lines of stitching on the shoe
  3. Analyze the “AIR” text. Usually, the fake “AIR” text is less opaque than the legit one, and it makes the fake pair having this text less visible
  4. Inspect the rear heel code stamp. Usually, the fake code stamps printed on the rear heel side, are either too thin or the characters have too much space between them
  5. Verify the orange tab on your sneakers. Usually, the fake tab looks like a rectangle, instead of a boxy square. Also, the green stitches are too thick on the fake pairs
  6. Check the tongue tag on your Off-White Air Force 1 OG. Generally, the fake Off-White pairs have the Swoosh on the tongue looking crooked and curving too much out of a sudden, while the authentic tongue tag Swoosh curves more gently and smoother
  7. Analyze the insoles of your Air Force 1s. Usually, the “THE TEN” text is too big and too thick on the fake pairs. The same thickness problem applies even for the “X” Off-White logo printed on the insoles
  8. Check the size tag. Most of the time, the “SZ” and the “MADE IN CHINA” texts are looking too thick on the fake pairs, and the authentic ones have the texts on the size tag looking thinner.

The eight fake vs real Off-White Air Force 1 OG steps outlined above are well-detailed and it will be time demanding to perform each authentication step when you need to confirm the originality of your OG.

That is why we have compiled this quick 60 seconds solution to authenticating your OW AF1 OG.

Expert Off-White Air Force 1 authentication

If you need help with the authentication of your Off-White Air Force 1 OG White sneakers, we’ve got you covered.

All you have to do is send us good-quality pictures of your shoes and we will get back to you with the results within 24 to 48 hours. The results will also come with a report on why we believe your sneakers are fake or authentic.

That brings us to the end of our fake vs real Off-White Air Force 1 White guide. We will continue to update this article as better and newer comparisons are put out.

Need our opinion on your item’s authenticity? It’s a service we provide.

Get a fully-detailed report for why you have a real or fake item. Takes less than 48 hours!

Alternatively, use our free resources: written guides and video tutorials.

Thank you for reading this,

Ch Daniel and Ch David

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About the Author

David is the co-founder and co-CEO of Legit Check By Ch. David's experience: 5+ years of creating educational content in the fashion industry. 6+ years of authenticating luxury items. Currently, David is the Head Editor of the LCBC Library, where 1,000,000+ words have been published, in free guides, for over 1,000 items.
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